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Tagged ‘UN World Conference on Indigenous Peoples‘

Indigenous Leaders Protect Mother Earth

A Culture of Imbeciles

Sept 18, 2014

Bolivia Conference

Photo: April 2010, A Bolivian Quechua native carrying her son, attends the inauguration ceremony

 

As Rudolph C. Ryser observes at Fourth World Eye, the call for environmental sanity that works for people and the planet — coinciding with the UN World Conference on Indigenous Peoples — is a chance for leaders from indigenous nations to press for the protection of Mother Earth. Indeed, the indigenous Aymara leader and President of Bolivia, Evo Morales, is responsible for making the world conference possible.

The People’s Agreement — adopted at the World People’s Conference on Climate Change and the Rights of Mother Earth that took place in Cochabamba, Bolivia in April 2010 — is the only realistic basis for seriously reducing fossil fuel dependency. While modern societies can hardly abandon fossil fuels altogether without suffering social collapse, there are ways of achieving effective solutions. None of which are being promoted by 350, Avaaz and other agent saboteurs of imperial civil society.

After failing to sabotage the Cochabamba accord, 350 has subsequently been busy hijacking activism on behalf of Wall Street. If anything lasting is to be accomplished on climate change, it will come from re-igniting the People’s Agreement from Cochabamba, led by indigenous governing authorities–not by falling prey to the Charms of Naomi.

 

 

Fording the River: Co-opting Indigenous Peoples

FordLogosheet_A_2009[FOR PRINT ONLY]

Intercontinental Cry

Sept 25, 2013

by Jay Taber

Ford Foundation is an ideological supporter of the World Bank (a mega co-developer of dams, mining and plantations in Indigenous territories), and a UN Millenium Development Goals supporter — along with Gates and Clinton — to do the same. Co-opting Indigenous peoples is a key objective of their neoliberal privatization project. Taking money from Ford Foundation is thus equivalent to taking money from Shell Oil, Rio Tinto or Monsanto.

Corporate Social Responsibility: Sharing the Gospel

CiCimage16

Intercontinental Cry

Sept 2, 2013

by Jay Taber 

As the one-year countdown to the glorious UN World Conference on Indigenous Peoples begins, corporate acolytes like First Peoples Worldwide will be graciously blessed with development derivatives lovingly laundered through philanthropic foundations like Ford, Gates and Soros. Spreading such altruistic largesse around to enlighten ungrateful naysayers and ill-mannered critics of Indigenous helping-hand policies by such selfless entities as FPW benefactor Shell Oil, after all, has to be handled with care.

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